SOLAR DASHBOARD

Total Macy’s, Inc. Solar Electricity Production on 11/21/2017

SOLAR PRODUCTION116.0MWh OF CLEAN ENERGY
52,292 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 89.9 TONS OF CARBON OFFSET
40,526 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO $12,412 DOLLARS SAVED
$5,595,240 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 194,886 MILES NOT DRIVEN
87,850,496 YTD

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3/2/2016

Recycling Goes Onward and Upward with Escalators

POSTED UNDER Recycling & Waste Reduction

Every once in a while, something simple happens that has a big environmental impact on our company. One such event happened recently with our Vertical Transportation Team. This team works to install, operate, and maintain the vertical transportation equipment and systems in Macy’s stores across the country. 

One project called for the removal and replacement of three escalator chains in one of our stores. As you can imagine, these chains are made of steel and are quite heavy. Here’s where some simple, out-of-the-box thinking by the Vertical Transportation Team came into play. The team – consisting of Larry Brandt, Dave Maletic, Phil Sniezek, Tyler Kresl and Tom Bingham – reached out to Chris Baun, their District Facilities Manager, to see if they could find somewhere to recycle the escalator chains. 

Arrangements were made with one of our distribution centers to ship the chains back with the store’s regular return trailer. The escalator materials were added to an already existing recycling stream of steel and scrap metal.

This simple act diverted about 2,000 pounds of steel away from the landfill!

Not only that – we also avoided the added expense of having the chains hauled away since we merged transportation with an existing route.

We simply cannot say how grateful we are that this team paused to think about what to do with this material. It’s a true example of working together to do the right thing for the planet – and for our business. The simple act of going beyond the status quo by the Vertical Team hopefully serves as a lesson to all of us. It should also make us stop and think: what else are we currently throwing away that we could be recycling?