SOLAR DASHBOARD

Total Macy’s, Inc. Solar Electricity Production on 01/19/2018

SOLAR PRODUCTION97.0MWh OF CLEAN ENERGY
1,494 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 79.5 TONS OF CARBON OFFSET
1,225 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO $10,728 DOLLARS SAVED
$165,242 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 176,535 MILES NOT DRIVEN
2,719,174 YTD

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1/9/2018

Associates Roll Up Their Sleeves for a Virginia Park

POSTED UNDER By Our Associates

Associate Spotlight: David Cruz

“The parks here are just gorgeous,” said David Cruz, visual manager for the Macy’s store in Fairfax, Virginia. “Virginia has some really pretty community areas,” he continued, “Idylwood Park is about 15 minutes away from my store, near the big beltway in Washington, D.C. It’s quite a large community park with a baseball field and kids’ playground. It’s beautiful, with nice trees and walking trails – but it also has a lot of invasive plants.”

Macy’s visual Associates near Washington, D.C., came together for a park clean-up event last fall to help remove invasive plants in the area. Cruz was the event’s coordinator and is a manager in charge (MIC) for the visual team in the Delmarva South District. He has worked at Macy’s for about seven years and has been working at the Fair Oaks Mall location for approximately three years. This was the first Go Green event in the district, and as Cruz states, “It was a very successful day.”

Invasive plants are non-native plants that typically spread aggressively in an area. They often destroy native plants that animals and the local environment depend on. Many park and forest services across the country work to manage or get rid of invasive plant species to protect the environment and keep the local ecosystem thriving.

That’s how Macy’s Associates helped out Idylwood Park. Cruz explained, “The park’s volunteer site manager met with us and taught us about the plants we’d be removing, as well as provided a little background about the park itself.” With lots of hard work, the group removed invasive plants along a trail and around the playground. In order to fully remove each plant, the Associates had to dig deep to pull out all of the roots. “We spent about two hours getting really dirty to clean up the park,” said Cruz. “It was a good event in terms of engagement, as well. I got to know a lot of the visual staff members better. We’ll absolutely schedule more of these, starting again in the spring.”

When asked why he volunteers, Cruz said, “There’s plenty of opportunities with the Go Green ERG and Partners in Time. I love doing those types of things. It’s the least we can do, and it’s not asking a whole lot. Plus, if you enjoy doing it, it’s not asking anything at all; you’re just having a good time. For me, it was a great day to be outside and to give back to our community by keeping Northern Virginia parks beautiful.”

In 2017 alone, more than 200 Macy’s, Inc. Associates volunteered in more than 30 clean-up projects, which equated to nearly 650 hours of service. Cruz summed it up best when he said, “Giving back to the community is really important. When I started working at Macy’s, I was pretty blown away by the benefits, the groups and the community service opportunities it offered. I think it’s extremely important, and I’m grateful that Macy’s promotes these types of programs.”

Have you participated in a Macy’s, Inc. clean-up event or an environmental project? Tell us about it. Or kick off 2018 by volunteering with your fellow Associates.

 

You also might like:

7 Fast and Easy Green Resolutions for the New Year
Doing Their Part In Paradise: Hawaii Clean-up Event
Inspiring Lifelong Sustainability Focus – Starting at the Beach

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