SOLAR DASHBOARD

Total Macy’s, Inc. Solar Electricity Production on 11/19/2017

SOLAR PRODUCTION106.0MWh OF CLEAN ENERGY
52,065 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 82.1 TONS OF CARBON OFFSET
40,350 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO $11,341 DOLLARS SAVED
$5,570,910 YTD

EQUIVALENT TO 178,062 MILES NOT DRIVEN
87,468,499 YTD

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12/9/2015

Associate Spotlight: Chelsey McGuire’s Take on Upcycling

POSTED UNDER By Our Associates

During Earth Week 2015, we received a great selection of entries for our RE-Think contest; while three winners were chosen, we simply couldn’t stop the recognition there. We reached out to associates awarded an honorable mention to get their personal take on sustainability, both in their work and personal life.

Chelsey McGuire, a digital project administrator in the Customer Service department at MCCS, has been working with Macy’s for two years. She sent in a novel idea on how Macy’s could upcycle printed materials to sell in-store:

When thinking about what we use the most, I immediately thought of paper. We send letters, coupons, catalogs and more to our customers, which costs a lot of money and kills a lot of trees. My idea is to use leftover catalogs and mailings (excluding anything with customer information on it) and wrap these to make beads, which can be used for necklaces, bracelets or earrings. These can be sold near the register with a go green message for our customers to see. Customers can also participate by donating old catalogs or mailings for a 20 percent off coupon for these necklaces or bracelets.

Although there are other companies that use this concept (such as Disney), we can keep these in line with Macy's style and brand. This is a great way to raise awareness and provide a way for customers to reuse items they would normally throw out!

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Some descriptionWhy is sustainability important to you?
I love nature. I view it as God’s creation and sitting on a beach or hiking in a forest or watching a beautiful sunset from my window reminds me of that. With that being said, I don’t want to destroy it. Though I would not consider myself as a person who is a perfect example of recycling and going green, I try to reduce my waste and reuse wherever I can to do my part.

What is your favorite way to “go green”?
Reusing and upcycling. There are so many things we can upcycle and that doesn’t just create less waste, it also saves money.

I just bought a house with my husband and we intend to upcycle as much as possible; everything from hand-me-down lamps to unique wall hangings to blankets. I’m working on a quilt right now using old T-shirts for my brother. I think upcycling and challenging myself to reuse is not only earth-friendly, but fun.

Is there an activity you do in your everyday life that you’d consider “green”?
To be honest, I wouldn’t consider myself as someone with “going green” always on my mind. Instead I just try to do things to prevent waste.

My mom taught that we shouldn’t be wasteful so I don’t run water unless I’m using it, I use re-usable water bottles, I recycle plastic bottles and pop cans, I try to upcycle rather than immediately tossing things such as furniture or clothing, I try to print on both sides of the paper, I don’t litter, and I try to combine trips when driving.

Though these tasks are small and often done without consciously thinking about it, I think that trying to not be wasteful in everyday tasks makes a big difference. Those around you may catch on and follow suit and the ripples continue from there.

Why do you think it’s important for companies to take an active role in sustainability?
Companies lead the way. One example is solar power. People thought solar power wasn’t worth the investment, but some companies jumped on board and proved them wrong. Now it’s widely accepted and even homeowners are making the investment. Big businesses have more resources and with that comes more responsibility.

One example I saw here is men’s dress shirts were originally packaged in individual cardboard boxes. Through some innovative thinking Macy’s now saves 150,000 pounds of cardboard annually. This may have seemed like a small change at the time, but it’s making a tremendous difference simply because Macy’s is such a big business. I also believe that seeing these actions encourages others think more about sustainability.

Thanks so much to Chelsey for doing your part to RE-Think every day. Be on the lookout for more associate spotlights as we continue to find inspiring colleagues to share their sustainable stories.

Do you go Green? Contact us if you or someone you know at Macy’s has a green story to tell.